Wednesday, May 28, 2014

New ceramics mural depicts principles of art and design

Four of 13 panels of the new ceramics mural
depict light, texture, line and space.
All good art embodies at least one, though you may not recognize it right away.

The principles and elements of design are taught in all art classes and are the focus of a new mural installed at the Chandler-Gilbert Community College’s (CGCC) Pecos Campus in April.

Created by ceramics lab technician Sam Hodges through a grant funded by the Maricopa Center for Learning and Instruction, the 13 panels of the mural represent the six principles (balance, proportion, repetition, rhythm, emphasis and variety) and seven elements  of design (space, form, time, color, light, texture and line). Each panel measures 2 feet by 4 feet, and provide a practical demonstration of how the elements and principles are utilized in art.

The mural was installed on the north exterior wall of the ceramics studio facing the Environmental Technology Center, a location chosen by the artist.  “It was important to place the mural in a location that was easily accessible by art students, so they could be used as a reference or to open a dialogue,” said Hodges.

Hodges started as an art student at Mesa Community College (MCC) and was chosen along with two other students by her instructor Linda Speranza to do an 38' x 17' mural for that college. The project opened a doorway to a career in public art.  She also began working at CGCC.

In 2010, Hodges conceived and proposed the creation of a mural demonstrating the principles of design for MCC, which was approved and installed on the art building. As staff at CGCC, she saw a need to have a similar mural at the Pecos Campus and widened the scope to include the elements of design as well.

Though the grant, which included the addition of the elements of design being added to the original six principles at the MCC campus, was approved, the funding was less than requested. The donation of all of the glazes by Amaco as well as the donation of all the clay saved approximately $3,500. David Andersen also charged a much lower fee to install the murals.

“The murals are representative of a circle of support for public art,” said Hodges. “I was given the opportunity as a student to become a public artist, which led me to propose and create art that is funded by the public and supported with corporate donations and allows me to engage other students in the production of public art.  It’s very rewarding.”

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